New Years Eve Traditions From Around The World

Every country has a different way to celebrate and we have chosen 9 New Years Eve traditions from around the world. Some places keep it simple, and some others like Sydney, have an amazing fireworks display. Did you know that Ecuador burns a life-sized doll that represents the past year? Or that the Germans have a TV show they like to watch and keep it mellow? Find out more of these curious facts in the list below.

Do you have any particular NYE traditions we missed? Let us know!

New Year's Eve Traditions From Around the World

By Hayo Magazine

The arrival of another year is a symbolic time for many, with many cultures bearing their own unique traditions and methods of celebration. Find out how the New Year is rung in around the world!

  • Russia

    By Hayo Magazine

    Instead of Christmas trees, New Year's trees are erected in public spaces and Russian households, under which family gifts are placed, to be opened on the morning of January 1st.

  • Australia

    By Hayo Magazine

    Australia is notorious for their magnificent NYE firework displays, specifically over the Sydney Harbour Bridge, illuminating the sky, and officially signalling the start of a night of festivities.

  • Philippines

    By Hayo Magazine

    As roundness is equated to prosperity, it is popular to dress in polka-dots, fill pockets with coins, and to eat round fruits, as a means to attract luck and good fortune in the new year.

  • Ecuador

    By Hayo Magazine

    In Ecuador, a key NYE tradition is "los años viejos," where life-sized dolls representing people and/or associated memories of the past, are set aflame as the midnight clock strikes.

  • Japan

    By Hayo Magazine

    At midnight of December 31st, Japanese Buddhist temples will ring their bells exactly 108 times, representing the cleansing of the self from the 108 sins in Buddhist belief.

  • Germany

    By Hayo Magazine

    As far as Germans are concerned, kicking back with a healthy serving of good food and drinks, while enjoying the British comedy sketch, "Dinner for One," makes for the perfect New Year's Eve.

  • Greece

    By Hayo Magazine

    January 1st marks Saint Basil's Day in Greece, where the traditional dish of vasilopita (bread with a coin baked inside) is served. The vasilopita is usually prepared on the evening of New Year's Eve.

  • Denmark

    By Hayo Magazine

    It is customary to smash dishes on someone's doorstep on New Year's Eve. In fact, it's believed that the more broken plates one finds on their doorstep, the more friends they'll have in the new year.

  • Spain

    By Hayo Magazine

    Spain's new year tradition dates back to 1895, when a surplus of grapes inspired vine growers to start the custom of eating 12 grapes, one with every chime of the clock during the midnight countdown.

Hayo Magazine
Hayo Magazine

An indie coffee table–style magazine for travelers curious about arts and culture. To contribute, submit your article pitch to info@hayo.co

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