Coffee, Culture and Calm in Beitou

Words by Bethany Leng

Photography by Jorge Gonzalez

Read the full story on Hayo No. 2: East

 

Sometimes a city feels like family. At least that’s how Yao-Lung Cheng thinks of Taipei. “She’s like an Aunt,” he says, “one that makes you uncomfortable as she slurps soup with unbearable noise, but surprises you with her good taste in music and film. Over time, you discover things you share in common, adding strength to the knowledge that you’ll always be family.”

 

Yao-Lung has worked as a barista in Beitou, the hot springs area of Taipei, for three years and loves its slower pace of life. “In other parts of Taipei the traffic, rushing crowds and street signs can be overwhelming—even for a local like me,” he says, “Beitou is more like a small town and is close to nature. You can see the mountains in the distance and the buildings aren’t that tall, so you still get the sunshine.”
 

Coffee, Culture and Calm in Beitou

By Hayo Magazine

  • Coffee: Sheme House

    By Hayo Magazine

    The coffee scene in Taipei is flourishing, with new cafes popping up all the time. I work at Sheme House in Beitou, located in a historic building formerly used to store rice. People come from all over the city for the coffee and desserts.

  • Gallery: Hong-gah Museum

    By Hayo Magazine

    Hong-gah Museum in Beitou focuses on video art, with a corridor showing traditional paintings too.

  • Getting Outside: Yangming Mountain

    By Hayo Magazine

    Taipei is a basin—we’re surrounded by mountains and hills. North of Beitou is Yangming Mountain, the hot spring source, and there are paved paths to hike. I used to go there with my family to eat “Hot Spring Eggs,” a picnic lunch cooked in the hot springs.

  • Get Fed: Lung Nai Tang spa

    By Hayo Magazine

    Peng Lai Restaurant serves traditional Taiwanese dishes. Try the fried tofu, cold free-range chicken or their specialty: crispy fried spareribs.

  • Get Cultured: The Beitou Hot Spring Museum

    By Hayo Magazine

    The Beitou Hot Spring Museum was originally a public bathhouse and is now a beautiful introduction to the area’s history and culture. Enjoy the Japanese-inspired architecture, classic Taiwanese movies—many filmed in Beitou—and exhibits showcasing the history of the hot springs.

  • Get Naked: Lung Nai Tang spa

    By Hayo Magazine

    Experience the hot springs at the historic Lung Nai Tang spa, built in 1913. It boasts extremely hot water and has two sections divided by gender. No need to pack a swimsuit—customers are required to bathe in the nude.

Hayo Magazine
Hayo Magazine

An indie coffee table–style magazine for travelers curious about arts and culture. To contribute, submit your article pitch to info@hayo.co

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